By Signing The Munich Agreement Germany Agreed To

The New York Times made the front page of the Munich agreement: “Hitler receives less than his claims from the Sudetenland,” and reports that a “joyful crowd” had applauded Daladier on his return to France and that Chamberlain had been “wildly applauded” upon his return to the UK. [54] In December 1938, the Sudetenland was the pro-Nazi region of the Empire, with half a million Sudeten Germans members. Daladier was convinced that the agreement did not appease the Nazis and that disaster would still happen, while Chamberlain thought there was cause for celebration, mistakenly convinced that he had achieved peace. The day after the signing of the agreement, Germany took control of the Sudetenland. The Czechoslovakians did not take retaliatory measures. On March 15, 1939, Hitler occupied Bohemia and Moravia, and Czechoslovakia ceased to exist. The day before, Slovakia had become an autonomous state of Nazi puppets. Many Sudeten Germans acquired jobs in the protectorate or as Gestapo agents because they spoke fluent Czech. Northern Rhine, in the hope of independence, was taken over by Hungary. An agreement was reached on 29 September and.m on 30 September 1938, Adolf Hitler, Neville Chamberlain, Benito Mussolini and Edouard Daladier signed the Munich Agreement. The agreement was officially put in place by Mussolini, while the Italian plan was almost identical to Godesberg`s proposal: the German army was to complete the occupation of the Sudetenland by 10 October and an international commission should decide the future of other controversial territories.

The American historian William L. Shirer estimated in his “Rise and Fall of the Third Reich” (1960) that Czechoslovakia, although Hitler was not bluffing about its intention to invade, could have resisted considerably. Shirer believed that Britain and France had sufficient air defence to avoid severe bombing of London and Paris, and could have waged a swift and fruitful war against Germany. [66] He quotes Churchill as saying that the agreement means that “Britain and France are in a much worse position than Hitler`s Germany.” [61] After personally inspecting the Czech fortifications, Hitler privately told Joseph Goebbels that “we shed a lot of blood” and that it was fortunate that there had been no fighting. [67] Although the British were relieved that the war had been averted, many were now wondering whether appeasement was the best decision. They didn`t think they were going to stop Hitler, and they just delayed the war instead of preventing him. Even when Chamberlain signed the Munich Agreement, he agreed to a huge increase in spending to increase Britain`s armament power in preparation for war. He must have known of the situation he described by General Ismay, that Czechoslovakia was lost, that war was to come.

Meanwhile, the British government has asked Benea to ask for a mediator. As he did not want to sever his government`s relations with Western Europe, the heirs reluctantly agreed. The British appointed Lord Runciman, the former Liberal cabinet minister, who arrived in Prague on 3 August to convince Benes to accept an acceptable plan for the Sudeten Germans. [23] On 20 July, Bonnet informed the Czechoslovakian ambassador in Paris that France, while publicly declaring its support for the Czechoslovakian negotiations, was not prepared to go to war on the Sudetenland. [23] In August, the German press was full of stories of Czechoslovakian atrocities against the Sudeten Germans, with the intention of forcing the West to put pressure on the Czechoslovakians to make concessions. [24] Hitler hoped that the Czechoslovaks would refuse and that the West would feel morally justified in abandoning the Czechoslovaks to their fate. [25] In August, Germany sent 750,000 troops along the border with Czechoslovakia, officially as part of military maneuvers. [9] [25] On September 4 or 5,[23] Erbe presented the fourth plan, which met almost all of the requirements of the agreement.